Social Security Disability

Social Security Disability

If you are unable to work as a result of a medical condition or have a child that is having problems in school or has been prescribed medication to help increase focus, you may be entitled to receive Social Security benefits.  I have been practicing law for twenty years and have twenty years experience representing clients with their claims for social security benefits.  I pride myself on providing each of my clients with the very best legal representation possible.  I along with my staff will strive to obtain for you all the benefits you are entitled to receive.  Please feel free to call my office for an appointment so that we may be able to assist you.

Who Should File For Benefits?

Anyone can file for benefits, even children, by and through their parents or legal guardian.  However, only those persons who are actually disabled (unable to work, or in the case of a child, functionally disabled) should apply.

How Do I Apply For Benefits?

Initial applications have to be filed with your local or regional social security office.

What Kind Of Benefits Can I Apply For?

You can apply for either Title II or Title XVI benefits.  Title II benefits are based on wage earnings credits and are only available to those persons who have paid into the system for a qualifying number of quarters.  Title XVI benefits are need based and do not require qualifying earnings.  Title II is known as disability insurance benefits and Title XVI is known as supplemental security income benefits or SSI.  The latter is need based and may not be available depending on household earnings and/or assets.

What About Medical Benefits?

Medical benefits under Medicare will be available to anyone who is approved for Title II, but not until a period of two years have passed after entitlement of approved benefits.  Medical benefits under Medicaid becomes automatically available upon entitlement to Title XVI benefits.

I Have Filed, But They Turned Me Down?

An application for benefits is a process and the applicant should be aware that most applicants are denied initially.  The applicant would then need to begin the appeals process and should seek competent legal advice at that point.  Any appeal should be filed within 60 days of receipt of the denial or the applicant would be required to restart the process of applying for benefits at the initial level.